Featured Books by Social Sciences Faculty

Below are books by our social sciences faculty listed by release date (starting with the most recent publication).

Dark Matter Credit

The Development of Peer-to-Peer Lending and Banking in France

By Philip T. Hoffman, Rea A. and Lela G. Axline Professor of Business Economics and History; and Jean-Laurent Rosenthal, Rea A. and Lela G. Axline Professor of Business Economics; Ronald and Maxine Linde Leadership Chair, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences
(Princeton University Press)

“This pathbreaking book will revolutionize how economists and historians think about banking, early modern France, and the connections between financial development and economic growth. Those who believe peer-to-peer lending is a twenty-first-century novelty enabled by Big Data and the Internet will be forced to think anew.”—Barry Eichengreen, UC Berkeley, coauthor of How Global Currencies Work

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Large Dams

Long Term Impacts on Riverine Communities and Free Flowing Rivers

By Thayer "Ted" Scudder, Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus
(Springer)

This book highlights the first comparative long-term analysis of the negative impacts of large dams on riverine communities and on free-flowing rivers in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Following the Foreword by Professor Asit K. Biswas, the first section covers the 1956–1973 period, when the author believed that large dams provided an exceptional opportunity for integrated river basin development. In turn, the second section (1976–1997) reflects the author’s increasing concerns about the magnitude of the socio-economic and environmental costs of large dams, while the third (1998–2018) discusses why large dams are in fact not cost-effective in the long term.

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The Neuroscience of Emotion

A New Synthesis

By Ralph Adolphs, Bren Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Biology; Allen V. C. Davis and Lenabelle Davis Leadership Chair, Caltech Brain Imaging Center; Director, Caltech Brain Imaging Center
(Princeton University Press)

"There is a tight logic running throughout The Neuroscience of Emotion that integrates theories of emotions, recent studies, and commonsense analogies. . . . Adolphs and Anderson openly acknowledge that they do not provide a comprehensive theory of emotion. Indeed, despite the existence of substantial research on the subject, we are left with the impression that we actually know remarkably little about emotions at present. But their enthusiasm for the topic is genuine and makes The Neuroscience of Emotion compelling and engaging."—Elizabeth Bauer, Science

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Quantal Response Equilibrium

A Stochastic Theory of Games

By Thomas R. Palfrey, Flintridge Foundation Professor of Economics and Political Science
(Princeton University Press)

"Well-written and easy to follow, this book covers the topic of quantal response equilibrium. The notion of stochastic equilibrium has changed the way game theorists think about long-run and short-run equilibrium. Written by three leading experts, this book is of great importance to researchers in economic theory and political science, and to graduate students."—David K. Levine, European University Institute

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Aswan High Dam Resettlement of Eqyptian Nubians

By Thayer Scudder, Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus
(Springer Singapore)

This book highlights the long-term resettlement process of the Egyptian Nubian people along the Aswan High Dam. Assessing the resettlement of 48,000 Egyptian Nubians in connection with the High Dam is especially important for three main reasons: firstly, this resettlement process is one of the rare cases in which research begun before the dam was built has continued for over forty years. Secondly, the resettlement of the Egyptian Nubian people is one of the few cases in which the living standards of the large majority improved because of the initial political will of the government, combined with Nubian initiatives. Thirdly, given the complexity of the resettlement process, weaknesses in government planning, implementation, and in the weakening of government political provide valuable lessons for future dam-induced resettlement efforts.

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Living Without an Amygdala

Edited by Ralph Adolphs, Bren Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Professor of Biology
(The Guilford Press)

"An excellent book from two of the major students of the amygdala. This volume reviews, outlines, and organizes knowledge about the amygdala—the orchestrator of emotion—in a wonderfully clear and systematic fashion that brings our understanding from its solid foundation in rodents to a new level. This is a 'must read' for anyone interested in emotion and its psychological and biological consequences."—Eric Kandel, MD, Director, Kavli Institute for Brain Science; Co-Director, Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University

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Revealed Preference Theory
Part of Econometric Society Monographs

By Federico Echenique, Allen and Lenabelle Davis Professor of Economics
(Cambridge University Press)

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Why Did Europe Conquer the World?

By Philip T. Hoffman, Rea A. and Lela G. Axline Professor of Business Economics and Professor of History
(Princeton University Press)

Combining wide reading, the judicious use of data, and economic models that distinguish Hoffman's explanation from that of earlier historians, Why Did Europe Conquer the World? represents the very best in economic history."—Timothy Guinnane, Yale University

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Nonpartisan Primary Election Reform: Mitigating Mischief

By R. Michael Alvarez, Professor of Political Science
(Cambridge University Press)

"Over the years, observers of American politics have noted the deleterious effects of party polarization in both the national and state legislatures. Reformers have tried to address this problem by changing primary election laws. A theory underlies these legal changes: the reformers tend to believe that "more open" primary laws will produce more centrist, moderate, or pragmatic candidates. The "top-two" primary, just implemented in California, represents the future of these antiparty efforts. Mitigating Mischief examines California's first use of the top-two primary system in 2012."

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Cool: How the Brain's Hidden Quest for Cool Drives Our Economy and Shapes Our World

By Steven R. Quartz, Professor of Philosophy
(Farrar, Strauss and Giroux)

"This engrossing history merges evolutionary biology and economics to explain our spending habits."—Mental Floss

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Election Administration in the United States: The State of Reform after Bush v. Gore

Edited by R. Michael Alvarez, Professor of Political Science
(Cambridge University Press)

"It is not only a significant work of scholarship from major election law figures. Just as importantly, it offers useful lessons about political reform for those who seek to change the U.S. system in the future."—Bruce E. Cain, Stanford University

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Experimenting with Social Norms: Fairness and Punishment in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Edited by Jean E. EnsmingerEdie and Lew Wasserman Professor of Social Sciences
(Russell Sage Foundation)

"The treasure trove of information in this volume provides important insights in the role of norms in both small-scale and more complex societies. It will excite the serious scientist and the interested layperson." —Ernst Fehr, Prof. of Microeconomics and Experimental Economic Research and Chair, Dept. of Economics, University of Zurich

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Evaluating Elections: A Handbook of Methods and Standards

By R. Michael AlvarezProfessor of Political Science
(Cambridge University Press)

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Contract Theory in Continuous-Time Models

By Jaksa CvitanicRichard N. Merkin Professor of Mathematical Finance
(Springer)

"This book considers contract theory in continuous time . . . This book is a good reference book for researchers and graduate students in economic theory, finance and mathematical economics. Continuous-time contract theory is particularly useful in finance. This book provides a basic methodological framework, which can be used to develop further advances, both in applications and in theory." —Susheng Wang, Mathematical Reviews, August 2013

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Neuroeconomics: Decision Making and the Brain

Edited by Colin Camerer, Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Economics
(Academic Press | Elsevier)

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Foundations in Social Neuroscience

Edited by Ralph AdolphsBren Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Professor of Biology
(MIT Press)

"[This book] is full of exciting chapters touching on such newly important fields as adult neurogenesis, and it embraces controversy where appropriate. In my view, this already superb text has only gotten better." —Steven E. Hyman, Provost, Harvard University, and Professor of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School

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Foundations in Social Neuroscience

Edited by Ralph AdolphsBren Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Professor of Biology
(MIT Press)

"[This book] is full of exciting chapters touching on such newly important fields as adult neurogenesis, and it embraces controversy where appropriate. In my view, this already superb text has only gotten better." —Steven E. Hyman, Provost, Harvard University, and Professor of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School

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Colorblind Injustice: Minority Voting Rights and the Undoing of the Second Reconstruction

By J. Morgan Kousser, William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of History and Social Science
(The University of North Carolina Press)

2000 Ralph J. Bunche Award, American Political Science Association; 1999 Lillian Smith Book Award, Southern Regional Council

"[A] thoroughly researched and well-argued book . . ." —Law and History Review

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Growth in a Traditional Society: The French Countryside 1450–1815

By Philip T. HoffmanRea A. and Lela G. Axline Professor of Business Economics and Professor of History
(Princeton University Press)

Winner of the 1997 Gyorgy Ranki Prize, Economic History Association; Winner of the 1997 Sharlin Memorial Award, Social Science History Association

"One of the most important books on early modern agriculture to appear in the last two decades." —Journal of Economic History

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Laboratory Research in Political Economy

Edited by Thomas R. Palfrey, Flintridge Foundation Professor of Economics and Political Science
(University of Michigan Press)